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    Healing Ointment for Babies 2oz. USDA Certified Organic Natural Healing Cream for Baby Eczema, Cradle Cap (Infant Seborrheic Dermatitis), Chapped Nose, Rashes, Hives & More
    Beauty (Era Organics)


    Era Organics


    List Price: $13.87
    Price: $13.87


    • A nutrient-rich treatment, made for sensitive skin. Our natural, hypoallergenic formula includes USDA Certified Organic Chamomile, Beeswax, Cocoa Butter, Coconut Oil, Calendula, Avocado Oil and a whole host of herbs and extracts-- all scientifically proven to help alleviate and heal the skin.
    • Help your baby get healthier, happy skin or your money back. Start your kids off the right way with a non-toxic, chemical free skin treatment.
    • Soothe itchy, inflamed and irritated skin with the first application. Boost healing and strengthen the skin the more you use it. Best natural healing balm for baby eczema, cradle cap (Infant Seborrheic Dermatitis), chapped nose, hives, rashes and more.
    • Deeply moisturize, reduce redness, soothe irritated skin, protect from infection and chafing and offer quick pain and itch relief.
    • As safe as it is effective. Paraben free, alcohol free, fragrance free and contains no toxins, phthalates, petrolatum, mineral oil and cruelty free.

    #hive - Hashtag White Outer & Black Inner Ceramic 1.5oz Shot Glass
    Kitchen (Molandra Products)


    Molandra Products


    List Price: $15.95
    Price: $15.95


    • This is perfect for a party, gathering, or if you like drinking alone.
    • This shot glass is durable enough for the dishwasher or the microwave.
    • When you need a shot of whiskey, tequilla, vodka, gin, or whatever alcohol, look to our 1.5oz ceramic shot glass.

Year in Review

Passers-by glancing in the conduct of Tam Valley or Old Mill elementary schools will see the usual quiet abandonment of summer replaced by a hive of construction as workers furor to finish a host of renovations before students return.

The Queen of Florencia

Hen Irene Rodriguez died last year at 72 of complications from Parkinson’s, Calvary Mortuary in East Los Angeles filled with mourners. A video screen showed photos of her beaming at various ages, for Irene was a woman who made her house a center of family and community life in the Florence-Firestone district of L.A. County. She and her husband, Raymond, a foreman at a plastics-compound plant in City of Industry, raised three daughters there, and as Irene’s siblings fell into drugs and gang life, she raised two of her nieces and a nephew as well.

One of those nieces sat in the second row of the chapel during the service. Dark-skinned with dark eyes, Arlene Rodriguez is an effervescent 45-year-old, yet she can quickly revert to double negatives and the finger-wagging “bitch, please…” swagger of the Florence streets where she grew up. Wearing a low-cut black dress that revealed a scar not far from her heart, she nodded to cousins, nieces, and ex-uncles, pointing out those who were down for the hood back when things were raging in Florencia 13, the dominant street gang in the area. Several of the men at the funeral had been to prison; a few women had husbands who were still locked up. Some people kept their distance from Arlene. Others approached to say hello. “My friends, they care about the person I am, not about the rumors,” she said to me quietly. “They’ve matured. They’ve moved out of that street thinking and barrio code of ethics.”