Health and Beauty

inhalers for asthma

Adult-onset asthma: Causes, symptoms, treatments, and management

Treatment

People can treat adult-onset asthma with a combination of lifestyle changes and medications. Everyone has their own treatment plan with asthma.

Adults are more likely than children to have other medical conditions as well, which is a consideration when developing an asthma treatment plan.

A comprehensive treatment plan often includes:

Bronchodilators

Treatment for most types of asthma includes bronchodilators. Different types of bronchodilators are available, including long-acting and fast-acting ones. Both types can play a role in the management of asthma.

Fast-acting bronchodilators, such as albuterol, work by relaxing the muscles of the airways. As the muscles relax, the airways widen, making breathing easier. People take fast-acting bronchodilators via an inhaler or through a nebulizer. The medications reduce sudden symptoms, such as wheezing and shortness of breath.

People can also use long-acting bronchodilators to manage adult-onset asthma. These drugs also relax the airways, but they last longer than fast-acting inhalers. Instead of treating sudden symptoms, they prevent symptoms.

Where would I find colored inhalers for Asthma?

I've seen blue and red and black and all kinds of colors for the regular asthma inhalers. I'm looking for the plastic peice that's usually white, but I'd like to get it in different colors for my son - I want to make his asthma just a little cooler.


Check with the pharmacy where you get the prescriptions filled, or go on yahoo search and try that, I know they make all kinds of dragon faces and stuff for nebulizer masks....


Your doctor would prescribe you this so visit your doctors

If I have asthma, is it better for me to use medicines and inhalers that reduce my bronchial inflammation?

If I reduce bronchial inflammation by using asthma inhalers am I at a lesser risk of developing lung cancer from having my lungs less inflamed? Do steroids and inhalers increase the risk of developing cancers or reduce the risk?


ask your doctor.

the answer to your first question is NO

I suspect the answer to your second question is also : NO.


I would probably ask a doctor those questions to be sure.
some inhalers though, im not sure what you have, i had alupent when I was younger with asthma, wasnt for bronchial inflamation it was to dilate my bronchial tubes so i could breath better.