Health and Beauty

bladder control training

A prospective cohort study of biopsychosocial factors associated with childhood urinary incontinence.

The objective of the study was to examine the association between biopsychosocial factors and developmental trajectories of childhood urinary incontinence (UI). We used developmental trajectories (latent classes) of childhood UI from 4-9 years including bedwetting alone, daytime wetting alone, delayed (daytime and nighttime) bladder control, and persistent (day and night) wetting (n = 8751, 4507 boys, 4244 girls). We examined whether biopsychosocial factors (developmental level, gestational age, birth weight, parental UI, temperament, behaviour/emotional problems, stressful events, maternal depression, age at initiation of toilet training, constipation) are associated with the trajectories using multinomial logistic regression (reference category = normative development of bladder control). Maternal history of bedwetting was associated with almost a fourfold increase in odds of persistent wetting [odds ratio and 95% confidence interval: 3.60 (1.75-7.40)]. In general, difficult temperament and behaviour/emotional problems were most strongly associated with combined (day and night) wetting, e.g. children with behavioural difficulties had increased odds of delayed (daytime and nighttime) bladder control [1.80 (1.59-2.03)]. Maternal postnatal depression was associated with persistent (day and night) wetting [2.09 (1.48-2.95)] and daytime wetting alone [2.38 (1.46-3.88)]. Developmental delay, stressful events, and later initiation of toilet training were not associated with bedwetting alone, but were associated with the other UI trajectories. Constipation was only associated with delayed bladder control. We find evidence that different trajectories of childhood UI are differentially associated with biopsychosocial factors. Increased understanding of factors associated with different trajectories of childhood UI could help clinicians to identify children at risk of persistent incontinence.

when spaying a puppy can it help with house training or bladder control?

my mini aussie has a problem with controling her bladder, she gets too excited and pees or can't hold it for more than 3 hours and she's 7 months now. because of this problem its also very hard houstraining her, she still isnt house trained and we are


House Training


House training your dog is simple if you follow a few basic rules. Remember that puppies younger than 10 to 12 weeks have little control. Accidents will always happen when teaching puppies to be clean in the house.


I dont think spaying will directly help this, but spaying will help with other things down the road, and it will also help her avoid serious diseases like pyometra and cancer, so its definitley best to do it ASAP with any female.


I would not spray your dog, because you could be abusing her in her point-of-view. Just keep training it, and don't worry she'll get over it as long as you keep at it and show her you love her, and don't spray the dog, because it doesn't work!

bladder control?

i have been potty training my two year old son and he is doing pretty good. he always tells me when he has to go everything and overall going pretty good. my question is that whenever he tells me he has to pee i have to take him to the toilet within 30


This is totally normal for a newly trained kid. That is why I never rushed potty training because you have to know where every bathroom is and be within 30 seconds of it for quite a while until they get the hang of it. Obviously a challenge when at


youre doing better than me my almost 3 yr old screams when I put him on the potty


This is totally normal for a newly trained kid. That is why I never rushed potty training because you have to know where every bathroom is and be within 30 seconds of it for quite a while until they get the hang of it. Obviously a challenge when at