Health and Beauty

Nutritionist Eating Disorders

Orthorexia: Eating Clean, but Crumbling on the Inside

Tom Brady, arguably the best quarterback in the history of professional football, isn’t shy about sharing his “core nutritional philosophy.” No white sugar or white flour. He shuns peppers and tomatoes. He won’t cook with any oil other than coconut, and never lifts a saltshaker unless it’s filled with Himalayan pink.

It’s a diet that legions of fans and “clean eaters” try to mimic. Whether they buy his nutrition manual (at $200, with a laser-etched wood cover, it’s currently sold out), subscribe to his vegan, gluten-free, plant-based, high-protein meal delivery service, or just try to make a go of it based on what they read online, they all want to achieve their own humble version of the Brady experience—sans personal chef.

After all, if it works for Tom Brady, it must be good.

But is it, really? Or can healthy eating cross the line into an unhealthy obsession?

According to nutrition researchers, it can. They are seeing a surge in what they call orthorexia: an obsession with healthy eating that becomes so consuming it takes over almost every part of a person’s life.

Seeing a nutritionist for eating disorders?

My psychologist wants me to see a nutritionist for my eating disorder. I've never been to one and was wondering if someone who had been to one for eating disorders can tell me what it was like and advise on whether or not it would be a good idea. Do they


definatley go. they will make you eat more but that just part of getting better. make sure you find a nutritionist you like and get along with. and trust me, they are willing to work with you, they are not against you. i am recovering anorexia right now


definatley go. they will make you eat more but that just part of getting better. make sure you find a nutritionist you like and get along with. and trust me, they are willing to work with you, they are not against you. i am recovering anorexia right now

Is going to a nutritionist helpful for people with eating disorders?

Please answer especially if you have suffered from anorexia


You would need to see a therapist and a nutritionist simultaneously. A therapist, such as a psychologist, would be able to assist with the mental aspect of the problem. An eating disorder isn't just about food. It is about a persons attitude towards


You would need to see a therapist and a nutritionist simultaneously. A therapist, such as a psychologist, would be able to assist with the mental aspect of the problem. An eating disorder isn't just about food. It is about a persons attitude towards


i think so, but it really depends on the person. sometimes it's helpful to hear things from a nutrition expert, or to have a set, structured meal plan laid out, or set goals for recovery (if you're in recovery, that is). sometimes it's good just to