Health and Beauty

Dietitian Licensure Florida

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EDITORIAL: New Jersey trying to make dietary advice illegal

EDITORIAL: New Jersey trying to make dietary advice illegal While New Jersey has much to be proud of with its healthiness ratings and robust personal-fitness industry, a recent bill gaining steam in the state Legislature threatens to upend its legal regime when it comes to health and nutrition. A committee in

When helping people eat healthier is against the law

When helping people eat healthier is against the law To obtain a dietitian license in Florida, one has to complete a bachelor's degree in dietetics, partake in 900 hours of supervised practice, pass an exam and pay over $300 in fees. Even if trainers and health coaches clear all these hurdles, many do

Military couple pursues degrees together in Beaver College of Health Sciences

Senior Dylan Harris analyzed radar signals on a submarine and is now majoring in nutrition and foods, with a minor in chemistry, to become a registered dietician. Senior Alexandra Stivers is majoring in friends he's made and life outside of school

Health coach claims Florida licensing laws violate First Amendment

Health coach claims Florida licensing laws violate First Amendment An area health coach has filed a federal lawsuit claiming the Florida Department of Health is violating her First Amendment rights by requiring her to obtain a license to provide dietary advice to paying customers. The lawsuit, filed on behalf of Fort

When helping people eat healthier is against the law

While at first blush it may seem reasonable to require those providing health and nutritional advice to obtain a license, the reality is much more complex. Many nondietitians have good reasons to provide both formal and informal diet advice to clients. For instance, physical trainers and health coaches will often advise their clients on how to eat healthier.

It’s far from clear that requiring licensure for dietary advice produces healthier or safer outcomes, but licensing makes even less sense for non-dietitians such as health coaches and trainers. For one, the costs can be prohibitively high . To obtain a dietitian license in Florida, one has to complete a bachelor’s degree in dietetics, partake in 900 hours of supervised practice, pass an exam and pay over $300 in fees. Even if trainers and health coaches clear all these hurdles, many do not want to become dietitians or nutritionists because they are uncomfortable with some of the prevailing dietary guidelines in those fields. As one example, a dietitian in Minnesota recently gave up her dietitian license after repeatedly clashing with the state licensing board over its preferred diet recommendations.